Archive for the 'Blouse' Category

Kalotaszegi Print on T-Shirt

September 2, 2014

Kaloraszegi stitches take way too long.

Here’s a quick way to get the design onto a t shirt:

Print the Kalotaszegi design onto multiple A4 papers tiled, copy it to the freezer paper on the paper side not the plastic side, cut the outline using an xActo knife.

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Mix 2 parts acrylic, 1 part textile medium

Iron on the freezer paper stencil, plastic side down towards the fabric

 

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Place a piece of plastic or cardboard under the design, in between the layers of the shirt.

Using a foam brush, paint over the paper to cover the fabric really well.

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Let dry and then iron it on the backside to treat the paint and fix it to the fabric.

It has been in the washer/dryer a few times, lasts pretty well, but the paint will crack if the fabric is stretched.

 

 

 

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My Version of the Maramures Shirt

August 29, 2014

From Burda 03/2009.

 

A girl’s top transformed into what resembles a traditional Romanian shirt from the region of Maramures.

Added lace under the neckbands and around the gathered sleeves and a woven colored ribbon at the neckline and sleeve ends.

This is my first version of the top, proudly worn by my best friend’s girl:

Silk

May 18, 2011

Silk and wool keep you cool. They are all natural fibers, renewable, fast drying, moisture wicking. I enjoy sewing and wearing silk for summer, nothing compares to it, feels so airy and almost naked like. People worry about washing it, or are afraid of it thinking that it can only be dry cleaned. I prewash my fabric before cutting, so it handles great even after it is sewn together, a quick hand wash with hand soap and line dry does the trick. It is amazing how fast it dries. A great source for silk is online at the fashion fabrics club, really good deals.

Fabric: hammered silk charmeuse

Pattern: Burda 06/2009 model 123 with the 122 sleeves and no frills.

The blouse in the magazine has some great sewn beads around the collar and along the frills, but I could not get the frills to be as delicate. The pom poms are made out of fabric strips, wrapped around two round pieces of cardboard with a hole in the center, then cut in between the cardboard pieces and tied together through the center. I’m not going to write another tutorial for this, there are plenty online. Here is my favorite: http://techknitting.blogspot.com/2008/05/how-to-make-pom-poms.html Awesome blog by the way, the techknitting.

This magazine does have some other great patterns that I keep on my list of things to sew, like the 128 dress

the 102 top that I have sewn and love, that would look just as good as the 101 dress.

108 is also pretty nice as a top or a dress and I just have to match it with the right fabric.

113 is also on the list from a jersey I got a while back in Israel.

Plus, it has a shirt dress, from the cover and many great plus sizes patterns. Great Issue!

Do you sew from “old” magazines? I think Burda patterns are too classic to go out of style and use old issues all the time.

Deep Purple Drape and Floral Skirt

November 14, 2010

Deep Purple Drape and Floral Skirt, originally uploaded by fmirela.

Blouse Fabric: Rayon Jersey
Blouse Pattern: Burda WOF Magazine 10/1998

The same pattern all over again… for the drape neckline top. I’ve also sewn this pattern recently in a jersey wool, green and the gray one awaits hems.

Skirt Fabric: Cotton poplin with cross grain stretch with floral pattern from JoAnns
Pattern: Burda WOF Magazine 02/2008

I simplified the skirt pattern by removing the waist bands. Nice pattern for a simple pencil skirt.

I added lace under the hem line and hand stitched the hem.

Lace hem

I also added a ribbon (folded over the raw edge) for the front and back facings.

I used an invisible zipper on the side.

I turned the overlocked edges of the side seams towards the inside and sewn over.
Lace hem

Green Fleece

November 14, 2010
 

Green Fleece, originally uploaded by fmirela.

Fabric: Polartec PowerDry found at fashion fabrics club
Pattern: Burda 12/1997 – modified from a Dress, kept the top part, removed the darts added the zipper.

Photo taken on anniversary trip to Zion National Park.

Dance for Rain

November 14, 2010
 

Dance for Rain, originally uploaded by fmirela.

UV protective synthetic fabric. Really keeps me cool ;)

Pattern: Burda WOF Magazine 08/2007. Love it!

I used pearl snaps on this one.

The view

August 30, 2009

The view, originally uploaded by fmirela.

I’m moving out of the place all together on Tuesday…will surely miss that view.

Here’s what I have been up to in June, a somewhat productive month:

Ellinor

Ellinor pattern from BurdaStyle: www.burdastyle.com/projects/ellinor

The knotted top:
Stripes

Another green T-Shirt with pearl snaps, in Lacoste fabric. Wondering whether to put the iron on transfer with the Grand Tetons or just live it as is….
Green T

Pattern: M-Patterns…disappointing. I’m really not pleased with the way this turned out, I don’t like the finishing on it, nor the fit…will probably just use this for the gym or a bike ride
Lacoste Green T

A strange one this time in Lacoste fabrics purple and green, some flowers iron on applique. the neckline is tooo low, i will probably add another green ribbon around it. I’m not sure I like this shape…
A Burda T Shirt

La Mia Boutique T shirt. I adore the pattern. A friend sewn a similar top ages ago, in brown lycra and I decided there and then to make one, or two as well. It did take me a long time, but I will probably reuse this pattern more often now. I think this looks great as a sportish look, but it could also be more elegant in a different pattern and under a cute jacket.
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Antique White

Crochet Dress

August 22, 2009

Pattern for the crochet top/dress

http://mirelap.wordpress.com/2008/02/12/crochet-top/

Measurements:

Bust: 80cm

Length: 86cm

Hem: 100cm

Thread: 220g

Crochet hook: Nr.2

Pattern: see drawing

Pattern_crochet_dress

. = chain

x = single crochet

| = double crochet

all those curved lines are chains of 2, 4 and 6 chains as indicated in the drawing.

Test square: for a width of 3 pattern repeats and a height of 3 patterns => 10x10cm

Back:

Start with the shoulder. Chain 13 + 3 for the edge and you will continue downwards. Make 5 rounds of the pattern and put the work aside.

Start with the other shoulder. After the 6th round of pattern chain 48 (i chained 53 just to make it larger).

After the 48 chain, link it with the other shoulder strap. The work will have 10 pattern repeats per width.

Continue work until you have 7 pattern repeats on the vertical.

Armhole shaping:

Make it wider with 7 chains + 3 chains for height, on each side, for the armhole shaping. Work will have 12 pattern repeats per width.

At 13 pattern repeats in total per vertical, first row increase to 5 chains instead of 4. Next row the height will increase from 3 to 4 chains. Next row the chain is increased from 6 chain stitches to 7 chain stitches.

At 19 pattern repeats in total per vertical, increase everything with one chain:

instead of 5 chain stitches => 6 chain stitches

instead of 4 chain stitches => 5 chain stitches on the side

instead of 7 chain stitches => 8 chain stitches

After 26 pattern repeats the back side is finished.

Front:

Just like the back. I did mine wider with two pattern repeats to fit the bust.

Click to download PDF – scanned from an old magazine, original in Hungarian

P.S. hope this is not breaching any copyrights…

Silk Jersey

June 23, 2009

I got silk jersey, in a nude color, excellent drape.

I cannot decide what to sew. My intention was to sew a PJ with long sleeves and pants to have something that breaths well in the sleeping bag and dries faster then cotton… but just can’t decide…I’d like to be able to also wear the top as is, not just as a PJ…

04/2009

04/2009

05/2008

05/2008

04/2008

10/2008

10/2008

03/2008

03/2008

The last two are my favorites…so far…
Or should I simply stick to the drape neckline of the simple yellow top?

What do you think?

Ellinor Tunic Sneak Peak

June 6, 2009

Pattern: Ellinor from BurdaStyle
This pattern is also included in Burda WOF magazine 04/2003

Fabric: Cotton with silver metallic thread JoAnns

Woven Ribbon: with gold metallic thread JoAnns
This ribbon was kind of stiff and hard to curve.

I’ve very pleased with this pattern.

Here’s how to apply the woven ribbon to the neckline:
Tip: to create an invisible seam for the application, I used a metallic thread with a special machine needle that has a large eye.

1. start by pining the ribbon along the neckline, then fold it right sides facing
1. Apply a non stretch woven ribbon to a curved neckline

2. sew in a dart with the wider base to the inner side of the neckline, the V tip of the dart away from the neckline
2. Apply a non stretch woven ribbon to a curved neckline

3. unfold the dart and see how the ribbon now lays curved along the neckline
3. Apply a non stretch woven ribbon to a curved neckline

4. You won’t be able to see that dart unless you look for the needle in the hay sack
4. Apply a non stretch woven ribbon to a curved neckline

Here’s how to create the corners in the woven ribbon:

1. fold the ribbon right sides facing, sew a dart at a 45 degree angle. I ususally pin it first to see which direction it will lay when unfolded. To make it unfold the other way, simply sew the dart the reverse side, with the V tip pointing the opposite direction.
1. Create a bent corner in the woven ribbon

2. unfold the dart
2. Create a bent corner in the woven ribbon

Tunic Neckline

Tunic Neckline

Tunic Neckline

3. the ends of the ribbon are turned to the underside and sewn with the seam allowances
Tunic Neckline

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